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Yearly Archives

2022

Learning Alzheimer’s Risk

By Carousel Slider, In the News

The actor Chris Hemsworth recently publicly disclosed that he learned that he carries two copies of the Alzheimer’s disease risk gene Apolipoprotein  (APOE) e4 (https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/culture/story/chris-hemsworth-discovers-risk-alzheimers-disease-series-limitless-93442609). We’ve previously discussed direct-to-consumer genetic testing that includes the option for APOE testing on the UCI MIND blog (https://mind.uci.edu/fda-approves-23andme-limited-direct-consumer-genetic-risk-testing/). APOE is the strongest known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. People who carry one or two copies of the e4 allele are at increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease, while people who carry the e2 allele are at lower risk (most people carry two copies of the e3 allele). But people with e4 don’t always develop…

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Untreated Sleep Apnea May Increase Dementia Risk

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Healthline – “There is a lot of evidence that links sleep apnea to Alzheimer’s disease risk,” added Bryce Mander, Ph.D, assistant professor, Psychiatry & Human Behavior, School of Medicine at the University of California, Irvine. “But there is limited data on the beneficial effects of sleep apnea treatment on risk for dementia.” He continued: “This study offers proof of concept evidence that treating sleep apnea may reduce Alzheimer’s disease risk. [It] also offers potential novel molecular targets for future study for those where positive airway pressure treatment is not feasible.” Read more here >  

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The Case for Disclosing Biomarker Results to Alzheimer’s Research Participants

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, Community Events, In the News

UCI MIND Director Joshua Grill, PhD and Jason Karlawish, PhD, Co-Director of the Penn Memory Center were featured in a recent podcast episode for the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center: The Case for Disclosing Biomarker Results to Alzheimer’s Research Participants. Listen here > Did you know that UCI MIND has its own podcast specifically for caregivers called, Spotlight on Care? Listen to “Keeping the Holidays and Celebrations Happy, Healthy and Safe, with Dr. Miriam Galindo” and tell us what you think.

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Topline results announced for Phase 3 trial of gantenerumab

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD On November 14, Roche announced negative topline results for their GRADUATE program testing gantenerumab, a monoclonal antibody against the beta amyloid protein that accumulates in the brain of people with Alzheimer’s disease. The program included two phase 3 trials (GRADUATE 1 and GRADUATE 2). As with other recent trials, the studies included patients with “early Alzheimer’s disease,” including people with Mild Cognitive Impairment and mild dementia. The trials were large and lengthy, with 1965 participants (across the two studies) who were followed for 27 months. According to the press release, participants randomized to gantenerumab demonstrated…

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The Latest on Alzheimer’s Disease: What Researchers Are Learning About the Disease

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

“Researchers are working hard to find a cure to Alzheimer’s disease … Through their efforts, new research and studies have proven helpful in ways to prevent the disease and even possible treatments. We learn about these findings from our panel of medical experts …. We also discuss The 90+ Study, which studies people over the age of ninety, how they live to that age, and whether their minds show any signs of decline. … Guests: Dr. Ahmad Sajjadi, Cognitive Neurologist, Associate Professor of Neurology and Pathology, University of California, Irvine….” Learn more here >

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The #1 Thing You Can Do to Lower Your Dementia Risk

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Eat This, Not That! – Nov. 1, 2022 ‘An increase in dementia cases is alarming, especially since there’s no cure and Dr. Michael Yassa, neurobiologist and director of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory at the University of California, Irvine shares why there’s an uptick. “Remember that the biggest risk factor is age, and we are an aging population. Advances in medical care have managed to extend our lifespan beyond anything we could have ever imagined a hundred or two hundred years ago. So the prevalence of dementia is increasing because we have more and more people…

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New treatments will have possible risks, along with potential benefits

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD and David Sultzer, MD A recent article in STAT highlights potential safety risks for anti-amyloid therapies, the frequent subject of postings in the UCI MIND blog. The focus of the article is on one patient who died after taking the anti-amyloid antibody lecanemab, a drug that was recently announced to have positive results in a Phase 3 clinical trial and is the treatment being tested in the AHEAD Study ongoing at UCI MIND and elsewhere. The patient experienced bleeding in the brain. As described in the article, the case was complicated but potentially important. The…

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MIND Matters | Quarterly Newsletter | Summer 2022

By Commentary, Community Events, COVID-19, In the News, Participants

Message from the Director Dear Friends of UCI MIND, We hope that you had a summer full of sun, fun, and good health. As you can see in this issue of MIND Matters, it has been a busy summer here at UCI MIND. Our investigators played a prominent role at the annual Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC), a focus of this issue (p 1, 3, 6, and 7). We’re very proud of our own Maria Corrada, ScD, who played a role in planning this important meeting (p 1 and 7), as well as the many researchers who presented their work….

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Recent grant success

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

University of California, Irvine Chancellor Howard Gillman states: “Our faculty continues to do a tremendous job of winning research grants, the lifeblood of our research efforts. In just the last couple of months…our renowned Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, known as UCI MIND, received a grant of $47 million from the National Institute on Aging; an interdisciplinary UCI team will receive $10 million from the National Institutes of Health…Clearly, the future of science at UCI is very bright indeed.”  

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2022 Buddy Walk

By Commentary, Community Events

The CHOC Children’s Neuroscience Institute and Alzheimer Biomarkers Consortium — Down Syndrome (ABC-DS) have teamed up to sponsor the 2022 Buddy Walk hosted by the Down Syndrome Association of Orange County (DSAOC). Funds raised for the walk support the programs and services DSAOC provides to their constituents. The event will be held on Sunday, Nov 6th starting at 11:00 am at the Santa Ana Zoo (admission included with registration)! In support of DSAOC, Eric Doran, MS, of UCI has created The CHOC/UCI Down Syndrome Program Team.  Please consider supporting this event by:  Joining our team (using the highlighted link or QR code above) Making a gift Sharing the event with…

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Summer 2022 Edition of MIND Matters is out!

By Commentary, Community Events, In the News

The newest edition of MIND Matters is now available to view digitally and will arrive in mailboxes soon! This issue is a special edition on Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) and covers: UCI MIND converges upon San Diego for AAIC Buzzworthy Brain News Evening on the Peninsula Michael Chang Foundation A December to Remember is back! In-person! Bright MINDs Shine at AAIC Spotlight on 90+ Learn more here > Donate to UCI MIND here > 

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UCI MIND Faculty Responds to AlzForum Article: How Will Alzheimer’s Trials, Treatment Change in 2023 and Beyond?

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Responding to an article written in AlzForum on the future of Alzheimer’s treatment and research from October 7th, Joshua Grill, PhD, from UCI MIND, and his colleague, Jason Karlawish, MD, from the University of Pennsylvania, write: “Anticipation that FDA will grant full approval of lecanemab (or another disease-modifying treatment) invites an exciting but challenging thought exercise: How will such treatments change research and practice for Alzheimer’s disease (AD)? We’ve considered some of the issues. Our top line point is that a new disease-slowing treatment is unlikely to make use of placebo controls immediately and categorically unethical (Grill and Karlawish, 2021)….

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Laguna Woods resident endured horrors of Holocaust and got a fresh start in the U.S.

By Carousel Slider, In the News, Participants

When [Helen] Weil was in her 90s, she enrolled in the 90+ Study, a UC Irvine program initiated in 2003 to study “the oldest-old.” The program started in 1981 as the Leisure World Cohort Study, in which Leisure World residents in their 90s filled out surveys about what contributed to their longevity. … UCI researchers visit participants every six months to chart their physical health and memory functions. … Weil’s age group, 90 and above, was featured in CBS’ “60 Minutes” with Leslie Stahl, first in 2014 and again in 2020. Learn more about The 90+ Study here > Read…

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The need for more diversity in Alzheimer’s research

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Christian Salazar, PhD, MPH, Hye-Won Shin, PhD, and Joshua Grill, PhD Recent papers in JAMA Network Open and JAMA Neurology further our understanding of potential differences among self-reported racial and ethnic groups in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) biomarkers. The two new papers add to a growing literature that suggest AD biomarkers may work differently in people of different races. Perhaps the most consistent finding so far is that people who self-report as Black may have lower levels of phosphorylated tau in the cerebrospinal fluid and now (in the paper from colleagues at Emory University) in the plasma. As noted by…

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Electronic medical records cannot deliver results with compassion

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD An article in the October 3 New York Times highlights recent developments in providing patients legal access to their medical records. Brought about by the 21St Century Cures Act, this effort aims to remove barriers to citizens having access to their own health data. Implementation of the 21St Century Cures Act essentially mandates that medical test results be made available through electronic health records in near real time, giving patients access almost immediately to their health information without context. This is producing challenges for clinicians and their practices. Some of these challenges were highlighted in…

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UCI MIND Partners with HFC for “10th Birthday Extravaganza”

By Commentary, Community Events, In the News

On Saturday, October 1st, UCI MIND participated in the HFC “10th Birthday Extravaganza,”  hosted by Lauren Miller Rogen and Seth Rogen. The event raised critical dollars for HFC’s caregiver respite and education programs. This includes HFC’s funding of the UCI MIND Research And Mentorship Program with the School of Medicine and several of the trainees were able to attend this star-studded evening in Los Angeles. The night of laughter and music also gave UCI MIND the opportunity to talk about our research, share who we are with the community, and allowed attendees (including Mr. Rogen) the opportunity to hold a human brain. We thank...

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Testing effective treatments as potential preventions

By Commentary, In the News, Participants

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD Since Wednesday’s announcement by Eisai and Biogen of positive topline Phase 3 results for their treatment lecanemab in early Alzheimer’s disease, the field has been markedly aligned. Most agree that we need to see the data but that this seems to be a clear win and an important step in a positive direction. Some debates have begun, and more will happen, about the size and meaning of the win—that is, the size of the drug’s disease-slowing effects and the clinical meaningfulness. These debates will be extremely important but will take time. Combined with recently published…

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Eisai and Biogen announce positive Phase 3 results for lecanemab

By Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Joshua Grill, PhD Today, Eisai and Biogen announced that the topline results of their Phase 3 trial, known as CLARITY, were positive. CLARITY was a placebo-controlled double-blind study of the monoclonal antibody against the amyloid beta protein lecanemab in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment or mild dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease. Lecanemab has been shown previously to reduce amyloid burden in the brain of patients with symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease. According to today’s press release, lecanemab was effective in slowing decline measured with the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR), compared to placebo. This scale has been suggested by the…

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Watch out, Alzheimer’s! Big new grant at UCI, new drug trial at Hoag coming for you

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

UC Irvine, a longtime hub of Alzheimer’s investigation, has been awarded a $47 million grant from the National Institute on Aging to support a team developing next-generation mouse models for studying late-onset Alzheimer’s. … “It’s an incredibly exciting time, and there’s a lot of promise,” said Joshua Grill, director of UCI’s Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders. … The project’s next phase will be co-directed by Frank LaFerla, dean of the School of Biological Sciences; Andrea Tenner, a Distinguished Professor of molecular biology and biochemistry; and Kim Green, a professor of neurobiology and behavior. [Subscription required, campus-wide access provided by UCI Libraries. Sign-up here: https://guides.lib.uci.edu/news/ocregister] To learn more, click here >

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UCI Alzheimer’s project wins $47 million grant from National Institute on Aging

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Scientists will develop mouse models to help unravel most common form of disease What began with a $70,000 philanthropic gift 12 years ago has grown into the recipient of a $47 million National Institute on Aging grant for Alzheimer’s disease research at the University of California, Irvine. The funds will be parceled out over five years to a UCI team developing the next generation of mouse models for studying late-onset Alzheimer’s. By inserting human genetic data into the models, researchers can better understand the biology that leads to Alzheimer’s and set the stage for preclinical drug testing. “This grant –…

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UCI is key member of multi-institutional, $126 million NIH brain mapping project

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Campus to receive $10 million over five years for role in Cell Atlas Network The University of California, Irvine will participate in a five-year, multi-institutional, $126 million grant from the National Institutes of Health supporting the BRAIN Initiative Cell Atlas Network. The project aims to describe the cells that make up the human brain in unprecedented molecular detail, classifying them into more precise subtypes and pinpointing their location. As a full member of BICAN, UCI will receive $10 million to collect, process and characterize a broad range of adult brain specimens. An interdisciplinary UCI team, led by Xiangmin Xu, Ph.D.,…

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First-Ever In-Person IMPACT-AD Course Held

By Commentary, Community Events

The Institute on Methods and Protocols for Advancement of Clinical Trials in ADRD (IMPACT-AD), is a comprehensive training program in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD). The course is directed by UCI MIND faculty member Joshua Grill and USC faculty member Dr. Rema Raman. Though in its third year, 2022 was the first time this innovative course could could be held in person and it was a resounding success. Throughout this past week, trainees from around the country, along with many of the nation’s best AD clinical trial investigators, stayed in La Jolla’s Estancia Hotel for an immersive, interactive, and comprehensive program. More than 100 investigators with…

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Recognizing World Alzheimer’s Day

By Commentary, Community Events

World Alzheimer’s Day is today, Wednesday, September 21st. This day serves as a time to spread awareness, educate, and reflect on the need to develop better treatments and preventions for Alzheimer’s and other dementias. On this day, UCI MIND recognizes the millions of people around the globe who are living with or providing care for a person living with dementia. In particular, we thank all of the people who have donated their time, energy, and more, to the cause of research to discover solutions for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

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Spotlight on Care: Alzheimer’s Caregiving ranked #9 in 25 Best Alzheimer Podcasts!

By Commentary, Community Events, In the News

Feedspot, an RSS service recently released its top 25 Alzheimer’s Podcasts on the web and UCI MIND’s Spotlight On Care: Alzheimer’s Caregiving was ranked 9th among the podcasts they reviewed. Feedspot reviewed all sites based on traffic, social media, followers, domain authority and freshness. This ranking is particularly noteworthy since the many of the other podcasts have been producing content for several years, some for over a decade. Spotlight on Care was launched in 2021 and now has thousands of downloads and over 25 episodes with excellent advice and tips for dementia and Alzheimer’s caregivers. Please listen for free at spotlightoncare.com and let your…

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25 Best Alzheimer Podcasts

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

UCI MIND’s podcast, Spotlight on Care: Alzheimer’s Caregiving, was featured in a list of the top Alzheimer’s podcasts by Feedspot. The best Alzheimer podcast list is curated from thousands of podcasts on the web and ranked by traffic, social media followers, domain authority & freshness. Watch our latest episodes at spotlightoncare.com. 9. Spotlight on Care: Alzheimer’s Caregiving  Irvine, California, US Welcome to Spotlight on Care, the podcast where we share stories, experiences, tips, and advice on caring for loved ones affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Spotlight on Care is produced by the University of California, Irvine Institute for Memory Impairments…

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33rd Annual SoCal Alzheimer’s Disease Research Conference

By Commentary, Community Events, In the News

On Friday, September 9th, 2022, UCI MIND, Alzheimer’s Orange County, and the Alzheimer’s Association Orange County Chapter hosted the 33rd Annual Southern California Alzheimer’s Disease Research Conference at the Irvine Marriott. This year’s conference titled, “Dementia Across the Lifespan”, was the first one held in person in 3 years and was simultaneously live streamed to a virtual audience.  The theme of the conference addressed different forms of dementia, contextualized by their typical age of onset.  As with previous years, the line-up of speakers was outstanding. The day kicked off with a presentation from esteemed UC Irvine Professor of Pathology and UCI MIND faculty...

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The 33rd Annual SoCal Alzheimer’s Disease Research Conference is tomorrow!

By Commentary, Community Events

Looking forward to seeing you tomorrow in-person and virtually at the 33rd Annual SoCal Alzheimer’s Disease Research Conference: Dementia across the lifespan… presented by UCI MIND, Alzheimer’s Association, Orange County Chapter, & Alzheimer’s Orange County. Haven’t registered yet? Act now! Virtual Registration will close today, 9/8 at 5PM PT. General and Student Registration will close on Friday, 9/9 at 11AM PT. Those seeking CEUs must check in at Professional Registration prior to 9AM PT Friday, 9/9. In-person attendees: If you need day-of assistance, visit the Registration, Professional, or Exhibitor booths, or contact conference@mind.uci.edu Virtual attendees: You should receive your unique…

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33rd Annual SoCal AD Research Conference

By Commentary, Community Events, Event Slider

September 9, 2022 8:00 AM – 3:15 PM PT Hybrid Event Join UCI MIND, Alzheimer’s Orange County, and Alzheimer’s Association for the 33rd Annual Southern California Alzheimer’s Disease Research Conference. This hybrid conference will cover a wide range of topics across the lifespan, such as Down syndrome, frontotemporal dementia, early-onset Alzheimer’s, the oldest-old, and even more. There are two options to join this year: In-Person: Irvine Marriott Hotel, 18000 Von Karman Ave, Irvine, CA 92612 Virtual: Registrants will be sent an email close to the conference date with instructions and links to view and participate live via Zoom Click here…

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Predicting real world spatial disorientation in Alzheimer’s disease patients using virtual reality navigation tests

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Vaisakh Puthusseryppady, a post-doctoral scholar at the University of California, Irvine in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior writes: “As far as we are aware, this is the first study to relate patient navigation performance in VR environments to their risk for spatial disorientation in the community. An important direction for future studies would be to explore and identify VR navigation tests and measures that are effective in predicting patients’ risk for spatial disorientation in the community.” Read more in Nature here >

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Early Adversity and Brain Development

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Early life adversities can have a lifelong impact. Tallie Z. Baram, distinguished professor in the Departments of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Pediatrics, Neurology, and Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine, determines why. Listen here > Prof. Tallie Z. Baram is the Danette Shepard Professor of Neurological Sciences, with appointments in several departments at UCI. Baram is a developmental neuroscientist and child neurologist and has focused her efforts on the influence of early-life experiences on the developing brain, and on the underlying mechanisms. She is studying this broad topic in two contexts: a) How early-life experiences, including adversity/stress, influence…

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2022 Beall Scholars Program

By Commentary, Community Events, In the News

With the generous support of Don and Joan Beall, UCI MIND and its trainee organization REMIND hosted the second annual and first-ever in-person Beall Scholar Program July 18-22 on the UCI campus. The goal of the program is to inspire students who are typically underrepresented in STEM fields to pursue careers in brain research and geriatric medicine.  Sixteen rising 12th graders were chosen from a very competitive pool of applicants from Santa Ana and Anaheim Unified School Districts.  Fifty percent of the chosen scholars will be the first in their family to attend college. The program included lectures from UCI MIND faculty and trainees...

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UCI research study links ALS to immune system dysfunction

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Findings show bone marrow transplantation may be a novel treatment approach July 12, 2022 Orange, Calif. — The immune system, along with the body’s central nervous system, may play a fundamental role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting that bone marrow transplants may be an effective new treatment for the neurodegenerative disease, according to a research study led by Albert LaSpada, MD, PhD, a distinguished professor of pathology, neurology and biological chemistry at the UCI School of Medicine. The study, titled “Clonally expanded CD8 T-cells characterize amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-4,” recently published in the journal Nature, was a collaboration between LaSpada and microbiologists Laura…

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Precision health perspectives

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Leslie Thompson discusses how UCI’s collaborative approach can help usher in the next great advancement in healthcare July 11, 2022 In February, UCI launched the Institute for Precision Health, a campus-wide, interdisciplinary endeavor that merges UCI’s powerhouse health sciences, engineering, machine learning, artificial intelligence, clinical genomics and data science capabilities. The objective is to identify, create and deliver the most effective health and wellness strategy for each individual person and, in doing so, confront the linked challenges of health equity and the high cost of care. IPH will bring a multifaceted, integrated approach to what many call the next great…

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Research reveals how brain inflammation may link Alzheimer’s risk, sleep disturbance

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Multisite team included UCI, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wake Forest University July 13, 2022 Irvine, Calif., July 13, 2022 – A multisite research team from the University of California, Irvine, the University of Wisconsin–Madison and Wake Forest University has discovered that brain inflammation may link Alzheimer’s disease risk with sleep disturbance, which may aid early detection and prevention efforts by identifying novel treatment targets at preclinical stages. Brain inflammation, sleep disturbance and disrupted brain waves have all been associated with Alzheimer’s disease, but the interactions among them have not been investigated until now. The study, published online today in the journal Sleep, examined…

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Detection of Brain Tau Pathology in Down Syndrome Using Plasma Biomarkers

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Contributed by Mark Mapstone, PhD UCI MIND faculty Mark Mapstone, PhD and Ira Lott, MD collaborated on research that was recently published in JAMA Neurology. Learn more about their findings: Studying Alzheimer’s disease in people with Down syndrome is a very important avenue for research because nearly all people with Down syndrome will develop the brain changes of Alzheimer’s disease. These changes include the abnormal accumulation of two proteins; amyloid and tau. In this study, we wanted to know if we could measure these changes in blood and if these changes accurately reflect the changes happening in the brain.  We…

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Doctors and researchers encourage people to be mindful of their brain health

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

DOTHAN, Ala. (WTVY) – Alzheimer’s and Dementia affect millions of people worldwide. Changes in the brains of people with the disease can start decades before the person actually experiences symptoms, that’s according to the AHEAD Study. With June being Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness month, doctors and researchers of the AHEAD study are urging people to be conscious about their health and their loved ones. Doctor Josh Grill, a University of California Irvine professor, shares tips to improve and become mindful of your brain health. He said taking part in physical exercise, eating a healthy diet, getting a good night’s sleep…

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How exercise may help prevent Alzheimer’s

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Exercise could be a powerful defense against Alzheimer’s disease. Three dementia researchers explain how it works. NOVA – When it comes to dementia prevention, sleep and exercise may work together, says neuroscientist Miranda Chappel-Farley, a Ph.D. candidate at University of California, Irvine. … Together, they create a powerful bulwark against dementia and represent a lifestyle factor ignored at your peril, says Chappel-Farley, who cautions against “targeting exercise but not paying attention to sleep.” Read more here >

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New treatments for psychosis in Alzheimer’s disease – pimavanserin and the FDA, redux

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Contributed by David Sultzer, MD and Joshua Grill, PhD An FDA Advisory Committee met on June 17 to provide input to the Agency regarding the effectiveness of pimavanserin for the treatment of psychosis in Alzheimer’s disease.  The Committee voted 9 to 3, with the majority finding insufficient evidence of effectiveness in this population. This input comes on the heels of an FDA review last year that declined to approve pimavanserin for psychosis in a broad group of dementia syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, Lewy body and Parkinson’s disease dementia, and frontotemporal dementias.  At that time, the Agency felt that…

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UCI researchers aim to diversify clinical research participation with $3.7 million NIH grant

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

The multidisciplinary team will focus on participant recruitment and retainment for Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders research What is the best way to recruit participants to join a clinical studies registry, and can such registries help better diversify clinical research samples? These are two critical questions that UCI researchers are tackling with a new National Institutes of Health grant, “Recruiting and Retaining Participants from Disadvantaged Neighborhoods in Registries.” The work will be led by Joshua Grill, professor of psychiatry & human behavior in the School of Medicine and of neurobiology & behavior in the School of Biological Sciences, and by Daniel Gillen,…

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UCI wins 5-year, $14M NIH grant to study brain circuits susceptible to aging, Alzheimer’s disease

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

Findings will advance development of better early diagnostic tools, new treatment strategies The University of California, Irvine has been awarded a five-year, $14 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study brain circuits that are susceptible to aging and Alzheimer’s disease. The research findings will advance the development of early diagnostic tools and the discovery of new treatment strategies. Xiangmin Xu, Ph.D., UCI Chancellor’s Fellow of anatomy and neurobiology and principal investigator, will lead an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional team whose goal is to construct comprehensive, high-resolution maps of specific neuron types and their connections in critical brain circuits whose…

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UCI MIND and UPENN Colleagues offer new guidance

By Carousel Slider, Commentary, In the News

In a blunt rejection of current norms, two leaders of biomarker disclosure research argue research participants should have the opportunity to know whether they have biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease . Biomarkers, or biological indicators of a disease, are essential to the study and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s and other diseases that cause dementia. Clinicians use imaging such as MRI and PET scans to measure biomarkers and make accurate diagnoses. Blood tests are fast becoming available too. The tests also allow researchers to develop targeted drug therapies. But in both clinical care and research, biomarker results are infrequently disclosed. Insurers typically do…

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MIND Matters | Quarterly Newsletter | Spring 2022

By Commentary, Community Events, COVID-19, In the News, Participants

Message from the Director Dear Friends of UCI MIND, Welcome to the new normal. COVID case numbers have surged again, but our research continues to push forward and our researchers have enthusiastically resumed in-person activities that have been few and far between over the last two years. This includes attending and holding scientific conferences, generally through hybrid formats, allowing those comfortable and ready to reconvene in-person to present new data, exchange ideas and forge new collaborations. Some UCI MIND investigators recently traveled to Barcelona, Spain to attend the International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease and related neurological disorders…

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UCI MIND postdoctoral fellow explores the link between spatial navigation and Alzheimer’s

By Commentary, In the News

Spatial navigation is one of the cognitive processes that is affected early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Liz Chrastil’s lab and a REMIND co-chair, Dr. Vaisakh Puthusseryppady published a paper as part of his doctoral research on the use of Global Positioning Software (GPS) to track outdoor movement patterns of people with AD in the community. He found that when alone, participants with AD tended to make fewer outings into the community, and once outside, tended to be more restricted in their movement when compared to their unimpaired counterparts.  At UCI, Dr. Puthusseryppady is advancing this work by…

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Letter from the NIA acknowledges Alzheimer’s advances made at UCI MIND

By Commentary, In the News

Dr. Richard Hodes, the Director of the National Institute on Aging, published a blog about the significant progress that has been made towards advancing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research in the past decade.  He cites several important accomplishments and specifically acknowledges the new mouse model that was developed at UC Irvine as part of MODEL-AD.  Led by Drs. LaFerla, Tenner, Green, Mortazavi, Baglietto-Vargas, and MacGregor, the team created the first animal model that closely resembles the human form of sporadic AD. Click here to read Dr. Hodes’ blog post reflecting on the 10-year anniversary of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease

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UCI MIND statement on Laguna Woods shooting

By Commentary, In the News

We at UCI MIND are heartbroken by the events of Sunday May 15 at Simpson Hall at Geneva Presbyterian Church on El Toro Road in Laguna Woods. We know very well this area, this church, and the community it serves. We have spoken previously at this very spot in partnership with the Irvine Taiwanese Presbyterian Church, sharing information about brain health and recruiting participants to our studies. All violence is senseless. Violence against people because of their race, ethnicity, political stances or other group membership is an act of hatred and even more tragic and painful. Our thoughts and prayers…

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